Everything old is new again!

Perhaps what I’m about to say will show my age (and no, I’m not telling), but there are two well-established science fiction authors I believe every middle grade reader should delve into at some point. They are Jules Verne (1828-1905) and H.G. Wells (1866-1946).

Ooh, I can already hear the moans and growns in the audience. “But they’re so, like, old! Who would want to read them. I mean there’s lots of really good new authors.”

Yes, they are old, so old they’re dead (sorry). And yes, again, there are plenty of new authors out there who write as well. But please, allow me the chance to continue before the virtual tomatoes rain down on my digital head.

I believe part of the reason many people see these writers as … dated … or more appropriately, out-dated, is the collection of film and TV adaptions we have been pummeled with over the years. Take, for example, H.G. Wells “War of the Worlds”(1898). Immediately, you either have images of Gene Barry (who?) running valiantly away from thrumming ships on three legs, with creatures that have three eyes, or you see Tom Cruise doing pretty much the same thing. BTW, John Wyndham’s novel, “The Day of the Triffids” (1951), covers much the same ground.

But have you ever read WotW? No? Well if you do, you’ll see just how different it is from these “action” movies. The original novel spends far more time focussing on the hero, unnamed, than on the invaders and their machines. It’s truly more about how people might react given such extraordinary circumstances.

Another great Wells read is “The Time Machine” (1895). Fortunately, an early movie adaptation stayed fairly close to the text. If you’re a fan of steampunk, as well as science fiction, I highly recommend TTM. You might also like diving into “The Invisible Man” (1897).

If we step a bit further back in time, we find Jules Verne whipping up sweet fictional delights. One of my favorites is “Journey to the Center of the Earth” (1864, revised 1867). In this novel, we follow the exploits of Professor Lidenbrock and his crew as they retrace the steps of Arne Saknussemm who, according to an ancient piece of text, found a path to the center of the earth. Okay, go ahead and laugh. We all know, today, that the center of the earth is a core of molten metal. But this does not take away from the beauty of Verne’s writing.

Another Verne book I can recommend is “Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea” (1869-70). Here we follow the exploits of, who else, Captain Nemo, as he takes vengeance against civilization. He also makes great scientific discoveries along the way.

The true thrill of reading Verne is that he was able to imagine technologies, that we see as common place, so very, very long ago. Unlike some early science fiction pulp novels, about space travel and weird aliens (think space opera), Verne and Wells create stories that though they might seem outlandish, today, still have a ring of truth about them. Good writing does last.

Now, here’s the really great part about author’s such as these. Their work is so old, it’s in the public domain. That means that you can download ebook versions typically for free. You can find them at bookseller websites such as amazon.com, as well as another site I recommend you take a good look at: Project Gutenberg (http://www.gutenberg.org/).

So download an ebook version to your Kindle, Nook, iPad, Android, or whatever. Or, better yet, step into your favorite local public library, and check out a few. I know you’ll thank me.

Nuff said!

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4 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Suey
    May 28, 2013 @ 22:16:26

    Awesome post plugging some books that I don’t hear people talking about much. Hopefully you can get some people reading them!

    Reply

  2. annettesbookspot
    May 28, 2013 @ 22:39:55

    I’m not a big fan of a lot of classics, but I love H. G. Wells! Nice to meet you!

    Reply

  3. WordsAndPeace
    May 28, 2013 @ 23:28:16

    Jules Verne: yes yes! I don’t think his books will age ever, for all adventure lovers. And what creativity for his time! and maybe that’s my definition of a classic: a book that never ages.

    Reply

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